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Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Westphal Editor. Providing a groundbreaking collective commentary, by an international group of leading philosophical scholars, Blackwell's Guide to Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit transforms and expands our understanding and appreciation of one of the most challenging works in Western philosophy.

Collective philosophical commentary on the whole of Hegel's Phenomenology in sequence with th Providing a groundbreaking collective commentary, by an international group of leading philosophical scholars, Blackwell's Guide to Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit transforms and expands our understanding and appreciation of one of the most challenging works in Western philosophy.

The Blackwell Guide to Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit / Edition 1

Collective philosophical commentary on the whole of Hegel's Phenomenology in sequence with the original text. Original essays by leading international philosophers and Hegel experts. Provides a comprehensive Bibliography of further sources. Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. Published January 20th by Wiley-Blackwell first published September 11th More Details Original Title. Other Editions 6. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. Lists with This Book.

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All Languages. Richard Dien Winfield. Richard Winfield University of Georgia.

Phenomenology of Spirit

German Philosophy in European Philosophy. Edit this record. Mark as duplicate. Find it on Scholar. Request removal from index. Revision history. This entry has no external links. Add one. Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server Configure custom proxy use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy. Configure custom resolver. Winfield, Richard Dien. His discussion of "Skepticism" is especially useful, as he uses it to thematize determinate negation.

Contribution

He fruitfully brings in the early Jena Skepticism essay to show how the Pyronnhian "trope of relativity" is also essential to the Phenomenology 's method This essay thus helps to flesh out the picture of the method from Westphal's discussion of the Introduction. Cinzia Ferrini's first essay is on the introduction to "Reason", which is indeed an underexamined turning point in the Phenomenology and thus fully warrants a chapter of its own. The importance of these paragraphs is clear in that Hegel repeats in altered form his claim from the Introduction that the basic problem that the Phenomenology is supposed to address is that Science comes on the scene immediately and thus needs to justify itself.

The standpoint of Reason's idealism cannot simply be assumed. It needs a deduction, which is just what Hegel claims to have given thus far in the Phenomenology. His criticism of Kant and Fichte raises the question of whether Hegel's own ultimate philosophical position is a basically Kantian idealism, one much better grounded but nonetheless recognizably a transcendental idealism. Within this context Hegel also seems to endorse the Kantian doctrine of apperception, and he laments the "scandal of philosophy" that is Kant's lack of derivation of the categories.

To highlight the engagement with Kant and Fichte, Ferrini brings forth relevant texts from the pre- Phenomenology writings, and raises a number of important points about the relation to the natural scientific inquiry that Hegel engages in the subsequent "Observing Reason" section.


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Readers looking for a key to the Phenomenology as a whole might be frustrated by statements such as this:. To sum up the dialectical movement of this section: although reason is in truth only the universality of things, reason tries to possess herself in natural things and not in their essentiality qua talis ; because natural consciousness's knowing takes sensuous things as opposed to the 'I', it neglects that reason is present in her own proper shape only in the conceptual inwardness of objective thinghood. I think I know what Ferrini means in writing of "conceptual inwardness", but this passage raises a number of questions, such as how to characterize the holism within which this talk of inwardness makes sense.

Ferrini unfortunately neglects the most important and most perplexing paragraphs in this text, namely those in which Hegel reconstructs Fichte's dialectical derivation of the categories in an account that ends in singularity Einzelnheit. Since this is the term that Hegel sometimes uses to describe his own version of transcendental self-consciousness, namely the Concept, it could have been a good point to discuss just how Hegel's method has progressed beyond the Fichtean dialectic.

Ferrini's discussion of Reason and the empirical sciences does provide a good introduction to her second essay, on "Observing Reason". This essay is a real outlier in the collection because of its bulky scholarly apparatus: there are eight pages of references and ten pages of footnotes.

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It will be a valuable resource for specialists trying to discern the sources of Hegel's treatment of natural science, and will offer newcomers at least the reassurance that Hegel was engaged with the scientific work of his time. Ferrini has given us a new road map for understanding Hegel's difficult claims about biological sciences in particular.

The shapes of consciousness in these sections are much more readily grasped than previous shapes, in large part because they are explicitly practical shapes of action or agency the challenge is more to link these to the basic epistemological description of the project. Pinkard frames his discussion of shapes of modern individualism through the idea of a "missing antinomy" in Kant: "On the one hand, we are always completely socially constituted and our normative status is derivative from that; and on the other hand, we are free, self-originating sources of claims that no claim of social utility may override" Examining the "law of the heart", "virtue", and "the honest consciousness" as so many individualistic attempts to resolve this antinomy, Pinkard provides a subtle and entertaining account of why the antinomy is unresolvable without making the transition to Spirit.

Picking up the text at the point where "Law-giving Reason" comes on the scene, Hoy stages a contest between Hegel and Kant, oddly enough by citing Rawls' lectures on Hegel and contrasting Rawls' Hegel with Christine Korsgaard's version of Kant.


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Hoy argues that Hegel's criticisms of Kantian morality are not fully answered by Korsgaard's defense. Hoy emphasizes that Hegel's examples are designed to show that law-based accounts cannot handle the "interpretive variability" of ethical situations He ends by defending Hegel's social account of Ethical Life against the charge that it forfeits any critical distance on a society's existing norms.

In the "Spirit" chapter Hegel quickly turns from immediate social unity to the conflicts within the ethical life of the ancient Greek polis. Jocelyn Hoy's essay focuses on the conflict between human and divine law that Hegel expounds through his controversial interpretation of Sophocles' Antigone. The core of her essay is a discussion of ten charges against Hegel by feminist theorists, charges concerning both his views on women generally and his use of Antigone in particular.

She analyzes these charges with the aim of showing "that Hegel's claims about sexual difference and gender roles need to be contextualized in terms of his dialectical strategy" The essay succeeds remarkably well at this task, and brings the dialectical strategy into vivid relief by contrasting it with flatfooted attacks on isolated claims leveled from outside the dialectic. Stolzenberg offers his own take on what Spirit in general is, calling Hegel's account "a critical-structural theory of models of world-interpretation " Though differing from the other views of Spirit represented in the other essays, in this practical realm these differences do not prevent the reader from getting a grip on the interconnections of the sections.

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Stolzenberg gives simple statements of what he calls "the Principle of Consciousness" and the "Principle of Spirit", and shows that Hegel's presentation of the Enlightenment's struggle with superstition, and its misunderstanding of that struggle, result from the interplay of these two principles It can therefore treat faith only in a critical, destructive manner, rather than reaching "the insight into the articulated fundamental constitution of the structure of spirit" , Instead of such an insight the Enlightenment officially ends with the French Revolution and the Terror, leaving the reconciliation to take place within the realm of morality.

Both the essay on "Morality" by Frederick Beiser and the essay by George di Giovanni on the "Religion" chapter focus on the greatest moment of reconciliation in the Phenomenology , the confession and forgiveness that forms the transition from Morality to Religion. Characteristically begrudging in his assessment of Hegel, Beiser writes of this moment of absolute recognition that it stands out from "the crabbed prose" that the "tired reader", "battered and bruised", finally reaches after the "remarkably obscure even by Hegelian standards" introduction to "Morality" , The "grumpy reader", the "impatient reader" finally reaches a lucid point of progress over Hegel's romantic and idealist contemporaries Beiser's summary of "Morality" illuminates the reconciliation less than Giovanni's essay, which is officially about the "Religion" chapter, but which instead reviews the place of religion in the rest of the Phenomenology.

Giovanni uses the theme of recognition in confession and forgiveness to return to the struggle for recognition in the "Self-Consciousness" chapter, juxtaposing the two as struggles in which nature and freedom each play crucial roles. This sets up Giovanni's most novel formulation: "religious praxis had indeed been in general, from the beginning, spirit's response to the anonymous power of enchanted nature" He gives a dense review of this praxis, in Greek ethical life, Rome, the world of "Culture", and the Enlightenment, before returning to the scene of confession and forgiveness.

Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit

Giovanni ends with a brief but provocative discussion of "what would count as religion in a post-Christian culture" That there must be something to so count follows from the fact that "religion, both as cult and faith, is for Hegel existentially necessary" Coming straight from Giovanni's essay, readers might be surprised by Allegra de Laurentiis's claim in her essay on "Absolute Knowing" that "revealed religion is necessarily deceitful" Despite some rather misleading claims like this, de Laurentiis does provide an engaging commentary on Hegel's very dense and difficult text.

She aims to show that Hegel thinks his accomplishment is to establish a "structural identity" between thinking and the objects of thought.